John Richards

John Richards

Partner (Guest Blogger) at Richards Law
John D. Richards III is the founding partner at Richards Law, a law firm dedicated to representing community associations and homeowner associations (HOAs) throughout the state of Utah. Mr. Richards is one of only a few attorneys in the United States to be admitted into the Community Associations Institute's (CAI) "College of Community Association Lawyers" in 2007. He is an experienced, highly regarded attorney focused on serving homeowner associations, condo associations, and owners of apartment buildings.
John Richards

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HOA Legal Costs — Who’s Running Up The Bill?

HOA Legal Costs — Who’s Running Up The Bill?

John Richards Too often, board members will meet and discuss an issue or project that they need to discuss with their attorney and will not appoint a board member to contact the attorney. Before they know it, all board members have contacted one or multiple attorneys for legal advice regarding the same exact issue. As a result, the association will have to pay twice the amount, if not more, for duplicative work on the same project. Read More...
HOA Records — Save or Shred?

HOA Records — Save or Shred?

John Richards Many community associations maintain documents and records for many years, even decades. Most state laws require that owners be allowed to inspect records of the association under specific conditions, but the inspection right is broad. In some cases homeowners will request documents in an effort to conduct a witch-hunt against the HOA. So how long do you keep records, and what records need to be kept? Read More...
HOA Hoarders — It’s Not Illegal to Live in Filth

HOA Hoarders — It’s Not Illegal to Live in Filth

John Richards HOAs are being confronted more and more with hoarding, but when working with the homeowner to correct the problem fails — what is the association to do? Some Associations look to state and municipal governments for help, but these organizations simply don't want to get involved and will only go so far if you live in a private condominium or association. In most cases this leaves HOAs to take corrective action themselves in order to stop the hoarding and restore the quality of life. Read More...
Getting Rid of a Common Amenity

Getting Rid of a Common Amenity

John Richards Even thought the most logical decision may be to close the amenity, the moment you do, many will argue “ …I bought here because of the pool (or whatever amenity is at issue).” The fact is, they’re right! The ultimate goal of a Homeowners or Condominium Owners Association is to maintain a beautiful and safe community. In order to achieve that goal, the board may ask if they can “close” or “abandon” an original amenity such as the pool, clubhouse, hot tub, weight room, or tennis court. It may appear that no one is using it, or that the cost of upkeep is too high. Sometimes the most logical solution is to permanently close the amenity or replace it with something that is far less costly to maintain. Read More...

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