The Buzz-Killing HOA — Don’t Let It Be You

The Buzz-Killing HOA — Don’t Let It Be You

Meredith Pond As an HOA manager, you probably run the organization like a business — and that's not a bad thing. After all, you have goals, budgets, and projects to worry about, just like any other business entity. But while you're focused on the workings of the organization, you also need to keep sight of the fact that an HOA — at it's foundation — is about people. Read More... [et_social_share]
Chronicles of the HOA Superhero: And Why That Shouldn’t Be You

Chronicles of the HOA Superhero: And Why That Shouldn’t Be You

Meredith Pond As HOA manager, you will face a lot of challenges. Too often, people see you as “The Fixer.” You're the manager, so naturally, you must be the source of any and all information, the sounding board for every problem, and the mediator for every conflict. You're expected to be an attorney, police officer, detective, judge, personal assistant, accountant, building inspector, therapist, and magician. Most likely, at the heart of the challenges (that are the HOA manager duties) is the duty to handle conflict. The type of conflict you're dealing with can vary like the days of the week. Basically, the only thing you can be sure of is that another one lurks around each corner, ready to pounce on you like a sumo wrestler. Read More... [et_social_share]
How to Change the World – One HOA Election at a Time

How to Change the World – One HOA Election at a Time

The odds of making an impact look a lot better if you focus your efforts on small groups — like your community. This is particularly the case if you live in an HOA. Here's an example: let's say that you live in a moderately sized HOA with 100 doors, and that about 50 people vote in the board election (great turnout!). Let's also say that you got informed on the issues and influenced 10 others in your community to vote a particular way. That means that you have about a 1 in 5 chance of affecting the final outcome. I like those odds! Read More... [et_social_share]
Heating Up and Cooling Down

Heating Up and Cooling Down

Victoria Cohen Homeowners living in Common Interest Development (CID) deed restricted communities, also known as homeowner associations (HOAs), must submit architectural applications to the Architectural Review Committee, or the Board of Directors to obtain permission to install air conditioners, in many cases. As you can imagine, this will add some heat to the already warm weather. So how do you prepare for this? Read More... [et_social_share]
Community Associations — What to Know Before You Buy.

Community Associations — What to Know Before You Buy.

Burke Nielsen If you’re considering buying a home in a condo or HOA, chances are you have some preconceived ideas about what that means. Some of those ideas may be true and some may not. The truth is, every community is unique, with a different set of benefits, problems, and rules that affect how you enjoy your new home. So, what do you really need to know, and how can you find out before it's too late? Read More... [et_social_share]
Avoiding the Headlines

Avoiding the Headlines

Harvey Radin Not surprising that in a random sample of newspaper and TV stories focusing on HOAs and condo associations, 13 of 16 stories were about disputes and controversies. Only 3 stories were positive.The news media love controversies. And why wouldn't they? Controversies attract readers and viewers like poop attracts flies. So you can bet if there's some controversy brewing in your association, a newspaper or TV reporter just might come knocking on your door. And it's not fun when that happens. Read More... [et_social_share]

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